Some of the books I enjoyed


Most people who read have an inbuilt system of prejudices and fears. They might dread the thought of feminist writing, or post-modernist experiments. Others are afraid of academic writing, with a footnote being akin to an incoming arrow. These are all reasonable opinions, if you really hold them. But why turn what is great fun … Continue reading Some of the books I enjoyed

The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood-the book reviewed


Margaret AtwoodTHE HANDMAID'S TALEISBN 978-0-099-51166-3 The Handmaid's Tale is a dystopian novel, written by Margaret Attwood, and published in 1985. It is presented as a first person narrative, by an unnamed woman. She is now known only by her new name, Offred, given to her since the new regime took power. It denotes that she … Continue reading The Handmaid’s Tale, by Margaret Atwood-the book reviewed

Rudyard Kipling – A short revisit


Rudyard Kipling stands, 85 years after his death, as a re-discovered literary giant. His re-discovery is conditional, however. He is viewed as a stunningly versatile writer, with verbal and expository skills which can still amaze us. His tone is timeless, and if read today his ability to convey exactly what he intended is remarkable. In … Continue reading Rudyard Kipling – A short revisit

The Narrow Road to the Deep North, by Richard Flanagan.-A short review


This is a long book. At first glance it appears to be based on the life of Sir Weary Dunlop, and it is written in a formal style, even slightly academic. Its title is taken from a 17th century haibun, a Japanese literary form, which synthesises haiku and prose. The range of haibun is broad and frequently … Continue reading The Narrow Road to the Deep North, by Richard Flanagan.-A short review